105 in 105 day 37: Nolan!


Update 2017: *Nolan is thriving at Courage Home Purple with co-foster moms Nikki and Merissa, as well as his foster siblings, whom you can meet here (scroll to the bottom of the page to the Purple home!). He attends Anjali School for the Blind on-site every day, where, though he is sighted, he learns academics at his own educational level. Follow the provided link to learn more about ASB, and to sign up to support them financially! Because *Nolan’s CP affects his mouth and his ability to form speech, and he does not have functional hearing due to being D/deaf, he is learning to use an augmentative communication app on his iPad (called Proloquo2go – I recommend this video for a short intro into the program, which can be used with eye gaze or manually with the hands), which allows him to choose from a number of word and phrase choices to speak and interact with others around him. *Nolan loves being a big brother!

Update 2015: *Nolan is fully sponsored. With his recently-received cochlear implants, he is learning to hear environmental noise. Because of his age, it is unlikely that *Nolan will learn to hear as well as a child who receives hearing intervention earlier in life. Still, he continues to prove how smart he is by becoming fluent in sign and exceeding all expectations in on-site school with his foster mothers. He is now the role model to two younger siblings who also are D/deaf and have CIs. He lives with foster moms Nikki and Tori and 11 foster siblings.

Update: It was discovered that *Nolan is deaf! He has received a cochlear implant and is learning to communicate in ASL. He’s quite good at it! *Nolan has also learned to walk independently with the help of custom orthotics which help keep his legs positioned correctly, although he prefers to scoot on his knees to get around faster and more efficiently. It has been determined that *Nolan does not have an intellectual disability; rather, he couldn’t hear, and this was the cause for that original diagnosis, as it was not known a the time.

Sorry this post comes so late, I was at the renaissance festival!

*Nolan is six years old and has cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and intellectual disability, but that doesn’t stop him from cruising around on his bottom! *Nolan can also walk using a walker or holding two hands. So handsome! He is described as silly, happy, and joyful – what a great way to be! But *Nolan’s life wasn’t always so happy. He grew up in a government orphanage where he was neglected and considered worthless because of his diagnoses.

*Nolan is not worthless! He’s an amazing little boy who deserves just as much respect as the next child. *Nolan’s society looks down on him because of his disabilities, but not everyone thinks that way. Sarah doesn’t think that way, and it is that kind of thinking that has allowed *Nolan and the rest of the 105 170 children and young people who live at SCH today to come and thrive there – knowing each and every child and young adult is worthy of care of their basic needs, including food, shelter, clothing, medical care, physiotherapy if needed, an ayah (nanny) and/or caregivers to help take care of him, and most of all. LOVE!

If *Nolan had been born in another country, he would have had therapy starting at a young age, and his CP may not be as much of an issue today. Though *Nolan has struggled, he is such a strong little man! I’m so proud of him. *Nolan has the capability of being adopted sometime in the future, so that is also something great to hear. But even if he isn’t adopted (and never say never, after all!) he will have a place to live for the rest of his life (or as long as he needs), because SCH doesn’t turn children away for ‘aging out’ of the system or ‘being too old’ for care.

*Nolan is fully sponsored, but other SCH children are not. To learn about the resources available for sponsorship for another child who needs it, read on below.

From his sponsorship page:

Name:  Nolan

Age: 6

Birth Date: June 2006

Date to SCH: December 2009

Other Details About Me: I have Cerebral Palsy, Epilepsy and an Intellectual Disability. When I came to SCH I was so malnourished that I couldn’t do much but sit or lie in bed. I am now a joyful, active boy who scoots around everywhere!

Spread the word, sponsor a child.

An important part of SCH’s work is YOU! SCH relies on donations to keep running. Donation opportunities include child sponsors at any cost per month, from as low as $10/month. Sponsorship usually costs between $300 and $500 per child, depending on complexity of needs and which city they live in (Ongole or Hyderabad).

You can sponsor any child who needs additional funding at SCH by using the resources found here. Use these resources to get involved in other ways, such as becoming an advocate or volunteering. You can also become a medical sponsor (ideal for large groups or organizations who wish to support SCH) and donate toward monthly emergency medical expenses; or an educational sponsor and donate toward a specific on-site school. Learn about other ways to give charitably to SCH here, and check back often for additional opportunities.

*A note about names: SCH uses online nicknames for the children in order to protect their identity, per Indian governmental guidelines which state that children in care may not have identifying photos of them on the internet, as well as no identifying information such as birth name, place of origin, etc.

You can also send gifts via Amazon India, make a one-time, general donation, pray if that is your calling, or volunteer at home or in India yourself by using these resources!

Connect with SCH: Official Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

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